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Colour Notes 5: Fauvism in mainstream painting

I like Bevan’s paintings which have an element of social realism and show how much horses were used to deliver goods. Wasn’t he on the fringes of the Camden group?

The Eclectic Light Company

For a few years in the early twentieth century, André Derain, Henri Matisse and others known as the Fauves (‘wild beasts’) dazzled those who viewed their avant garde art. Not only were their colours intense, often raw from the tube, but they were so inappropriate. Flesh became vivid green, buildings and horses blue, and skies blood red. For most it was a passing phase, and by 1908 the wild beasts had stampeded on to the next fad as modernism evolved volcanically.

Their influence was more lasting and general, though, affecting other artists until the Second World War. In this article I look at how other, more mainstream painters had their own Fauvist phase.

In some ways a continuation of the changes seen in Post-Impressionism, high chroma paintings had become common among those painting in the south of France, the Midi, with its brilliant and different light.

Paul Signac, The Port of Saint-Tropez (1901-2), oil on canvas, 131 x 161.5 cm, National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo. WikiArt. Paul Signac (1863-1935), The…

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Autoportrait Day 138~ Erzsébet Korb

Somewhat austere and contemplative.

The Misty Miss Christy

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Autoportrait Day 137~ Yana Movchan

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Franz Kafka – The Top (short story)

That story about the top is new to me but yet seems oddly familiar. Along with spirals and Yeats use of “gyre” it seems both mystical and philosophical. Then there was that magnificent musical, “Carousel” which had a huge effect on me when I was about twelve years old!

Intermittencies of the Mind

I recently read Kafka’s (unfinished) novel The Castle, which I had last read about thirty or so years ago. I thought The Trial, The Castle and The Metamorphosis were the bees’ knees when I originally read them, and still do, but didn’t really think much of Amerika or the other short stories at the time. I think I didn’t like them much because they were not like The Trial etc., but my relatively recent re-read of Amerika showed me that it was worth attempting these other works without expecting them to be another version of The Trial.

The Vintage collection I read is split between ‘Longer’ and ‘Shorter’ stories, with some of the shorter stories being less than a page long; some were just fragments of stories and many were only published posthumously. Having finished the collection, I’m beginning to appreciate just how inventive Kafka was as…

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Jan Potocki: Voyages

Interesting period and like Conrad a great traveller and reporter!

LIT.GAZ.

     I bought this because I was planning to re-read his amazing novel The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, and then watch the film; I hadn’t known much about his life or that he was widely travelled, in the years at the end of the eighteenth century when his native Poland was gradually being dismembered and removed from the map of Europe.

Potocki is a careful observer with a good eye for detail and a focus on the exotic (or what would have seemed exotic to a European traveller at the time). The book is extremely well presented with a very detailed commentary and copious annotation, rather like the current Hakluyt Society volumes in the UK. The one thing seriously lacking is maps of any sort, to allow the curious reader to track the traveller’s progress.

It’s a strange mish-mash of places: travel through Holland during a revolution, extensive…

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A Day in ……….Fowey, Cornwall

Garabaldi had connections with Fowey and more can be discovered at the Museum there. Good place for secondhand books too!

French Travel Books - Paris, Provence & French Food & Wine

Alt="Polruan Ferry arrives at Fowey Harbour Cornwall"
Polruan ferry arrives at Fowey Harbour

It had been some 35 years since our last visit to Fowey, the small port town at the mouth of the Fowey River on the south Cornish coast. The day before we had been disappointed by a return visit to Looe just along the coast. Looe appeared shabby and uninviting; the cafes and shops did not tempt you inside. It did not appear to be making the best of its stunning location which was a shame. So has Fowey fared any better in the intervening years? We were a little apprehensive that we may be making another somewhat wasted journey. Fowey had indeed fared well, and this town was making the most of an even more stunning location.

Parking the car at the top of the town is easy and the charges reasonable. They have kindly put the disabled spaces close to the car…

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Summer Reading Suggestions

Looks like a useful list of recommendations. I think I would turn to The Sea Gate first for local reasons!

Gina Buonaguro

Any chance you’re making summer travel plans? International, local, or just with a lemonade in the backyard, you’ll need something to read, right? Here are books I’ve read over the last nine months and would highly recommend to keep your brain engaged and traveling, even if you don’t set foot outside your hometown.

The best place to read is with your cat at your side

The Admiral’s Wife by M.K. Tod – This book is just really good historical fiction, a page turner I could not put down. I learned about an era and culture I knew almost nothing about (early 20th century Hong Kong), and it was woven so well with the modern day story. The author did a wonderful job with the plot, the history, the emotions, the family dynamics, and the nuance. (Not to mention that I did a presentation with Mary this winter, and she’s…

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Paintings of Paul Signac 4: Two deaths and marriage

Still taken by the classical contemplative atmosphere of Signac and his interest in colour theory. Thank you for your research once again.

The Eclectic Light Company

In the autumn of 1889, Paul Signac (1863-1935) was busy completing a set of plates for two books by Charles Henry, a project which he estimated took him over six hundred hours. He was disappointed, though, by the rift between his Neo-Impressionists and Camille Pissarro, who had returned to Impressionism.

In January 1890, Signac again attended the Salon des XX in Brussels. This was marred by the painter Henry De Groux, who had made offensive remarks about Vincent van Gogh, which nearly ended in a duel. Over the winter, Signac was also busy finishing his masterpiece Sunday, which he exhibited at the Salon des Indépendents in March.

Paul Signac, Un Dimanche (Sunday) (1888-90), oil on canvas, 150 x 150 cm, Private collection. WikiArt, Wikimedia Commons. Paul Signac, Un Dimanche (Sunday) (Op 201) (1888 Oct – 90 Mar), oil on canvas, 150 x 150 cm, Private collection. WikiArt, Wikimedia Commons.

Sunday, which Signac started in October 1888 and completed in March 1890, is perhaps the best-known of his interiors…

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Autoportrait Day 132~ Eva Schulze-Knabe

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Entry Gate, Chengdu, China

Tremendous photography!!

Nicholas Koch

Tree Tunnel Path to Halnaker Mill, West Sussex. England
#Entry Gate, #Chengdu, #China

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