Simone Weil on Education

Although people seem to be unaware of it today, the development of the faculty of attention forms the real object and almost the sole interest of studies. Most school tasks have a certain intrinsic interest as well, but such an interest is secondary. All tasks that really call upon the power of attention are interesting for the same reason and to an almost equal degree. ( On the right use of School Studies with a view to the Love of God)

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Entre deux coeurs qui s’aiment, nul besoin de paroles.

Le Pont Mirabeau

Sous le pont Mirabeau coule la Seine

Et nos amours

Faut-il qu’il m’en souvienne

La joie venait toujours après la peine.

Vienne la nuit sonne l’heure

Les jours s’en vont je demeure

Les mains dans les mains restons face à face

Tandis que sousLe pont de nos bras passe

Des éternels regards l’onde si lasse

Vienne la nuit sonne l’heure

Les jours s’en vont je demeure

L’amour s’en va comme cette eau courante

L’amour s’en va Comme la vie est lente

Et comme l’Espérance est violente

Vienne la nuit sonne l’heure

Les jours s’en vont je demeure

Passent les jours et passent les semaines

Ni temps passé

Ni les amours reviennent

Sous le pont Mirabeau coule la Seine

Guillaume Apollinaire (1912)

There is a translation at https://www.talkinfrench.com/french-poems-english-translations/

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Joachim Ringelnatz und Strassenbahnen

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Strassenbahn 23 und 13

 

Was nur in Frankfurt sich begibt:

Die Trambahn hielt auf offner Strecke.

Sie sah am Wege eine Schnecke

Und sagte gähnend: »Steigen Sie ein, wenn es Ihnen beliebt.«

Die Schnecke wehrte: »Danke, mir pressiert es.«

Da gab die Bahn ein Abfahrtssignal und noch eins und

ein drittes und viertes.

Und wirklich begann sie allmählich weiter zu fahren,

Um noch vor Sonntag die nächste Station zu erreichen.

Dort lagen an dreihundert Leichen,

Lauter Leute, die über dem Warten verhungert waren.

 

Joachim Ringelnatz wurde als jüngstes von drei Geschwistern in einem Wohn- und Geschäftshaus am Crostigall 14 in Wurzen bei Leipzig um „11 ¾ Uhr“ in einem Zimmer über dem Flur geboren, wie der Geburtsschein der Hebamme belegt. Seine Eltern waren beide künstlerisch tätig. Sein Vater Georg Bötticher, der einer thüringischen Gelehrtenfamilie entstammte, war ein Musterzeichner und später hauptberuflicher Verfasser von humoristischen Versen und Kinderbüchern. Er veröffentlichte vierzig Bücher, unter anderem in Reclams Universal-Bibliothek. Die Mutter Rosa Marie, Tochter eines Sägewerksbesitzers, zeichnete ebenfalls, entwarf Muster für Perlstickereien und stellte Puppenbekleidung her. Ringelnatz wuchs in bescheidenem Wohlstand auf: Die Familie beschäftigte zwei Dienstmädchen.

Quelle:-https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_Ringelnatz

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camborne_and_Redruth_Tramways

Under Byronic influences-Liebesleid (1910)- once again with Max Raabe!

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Reproduction of Portrait of Lord Byron by Thomas Phillips

I have been reading Frederich Raphael on Byron-which is full of witty asides and ironic comments. It is also very perceptive and entertaining. However, Youtube fails on readings of his work-perhaps unsurprisingly.
However, put into the frame of mind by Byron I found this following clipagain, which I very much like this very old lovesong which has subtitles in French-good for the brain! The melody is enticing and certainly is both seasonal and lyrically delightful. As someone has commented;”Une perfection, une merveille…

Max Raabe est un très grand Artiste! Merci!”.

 

 

Time for Mediaeval Latin (MS of Benedictbeuern)

The woods are green with branches

And sweet with nightingales,

With gold and blue and scarlet

All flowered are the dales.

Sweet it is to wander

In a place of trees,

Sweeter to pluck roses

And the fleur-de-lys.

But dalliance with a lovely lass

Far surpasseth these.

White Lilies Stock Photo - 9232730

Fronde nemus induitur

iam canit philomena

cum variis coloribus

iam prata sunt amena,

spatiari dulce est

per loca nemorosa,

dulcius est carpere

lilia cum rosa,

dulcissimum est ludere

cum virgine formosa.

(Source- Mediaeval Latin Lyrics by Helen Waddell -Constable and Co-first published 1929)

 

AUGUST MACKE: “MÄDCHEN UNTER BÄUMEN”

The Old Lizard by Lorca

Federico García Lorca1898 – 1936

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In the parched path 
I have seen the good lizard 
(one drop of crocodile) 
meditating. 
With his green frock-coat 
of an abbot of the devil, 
his correct bearing 
and his stiff collar, 
he has the sad air 
of an old professor. 
Those faded eyes 
of a broken artist, 
how they watch the afternoon 
in dismay!

Is this, my friend, 
your twilight constitutional? 
Please use your cane, 
you are very old, Mr. Lizard, 
and the children of the village 
may startle you.
What are you seeking in the path, 
my near-sighted philosopher, 
if the wavering phantasm 
of the parched afternoon 
has broken the horizon? 

Are you seeking the blue alms 
of the moribund heaven? 
A penny of a star? 
Or perhaps 
you’ve been reading a volume 
of Lamartine, and you relish 
the plateresque trills 
of the birds? 

(You watch the setting sun, 
and your eyes shine, 
oh, dragon of the frogs, 
with a human radiance. 
Ideas, gondolas without oars, 
cross the shadowy 
waters of your 
burnt-out eyes.) 

Have you come looking 
for that lovely lady lizard, 
green as the wheatfields 
of May, 
as the long locks
of sleeping pools, 
who scorned you, and then 
left you in your field? 
Oh, sweet idyll, broken 
among the sweet sedges! 
But, live! What the devil! 
I like you. 
The motto “I oppose 
the serpent” triumphs 
in that grand double chin 
of a Christian archbishop. 

Now the sun has dissolved 
in the cup of the mountains, 
and the flocks 
cloud the roadway. 
It is the hour to depart: 
leave the dry path 
and your meditations. 
You will have time 
to look at the stars 
when the worms are eating you 
at their leisure.


Go home to your house 
by the village, of the crickets! 
Good night, my friend 
Mr. Lizard! 

Now the field is empty, 
the mountains dim, 
the roadway deserted. 
Only, now and again, 
a cuckoo sings in the darkness 
of the poplar trees.
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From the website www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/old-lizard

Thoughts and comparisons translating “Herbst” by Rilke

Rainer Maria Rilke: „Herbst”

Die Blätter fallen, fallen wie von weit,
als welkten in den Himmeln ferne Gärten;
sie fallen mit verneinender Gebärde.

Und in den Nächten fällt die schwere Erde
aus allen Sternen in die Einsamkeit.

Wir alle fallen. Diese Hand da fällt.
Und sieh dir andre an: es ist in allen.

Und doch ist Einer, welcher dieses Fallen
unendlich sanft in seinen Händen hält.

Image result for Leaves by Egon Schiele

There are several translations of this interesting poem which appear to be copyrighted. In particular mit verneinender Gebärde seems not easy to render into English. Something like with a gesture of decline doesn’t quite measure up. Anyway the poem seems to make a parallel between the seasonal fall and the religious sense of falling form divine Grace. It put me in mind of the lines from a familiar hymn:-

To all life thou givest — to both great and small;
In all life thou livest, the true life of all;
We blossom and flourish as leaves on the tree,
And wither and perish—but nought changeth thee.

This is a famous hymn by  Walter Chalmers Smith, “Immortal, Invisible, God only Wise”.

Immortal, invisible, God only wise,
In light inaccessible hid from our eyes,
Most blessèd, most glorious, the Ancient of Days,
Almighty, victorious, thy great Name we praise.

Unresting, unhasting, and silent as light,
Nor wanting, nor wasting, thou rulest in might;
Thy justice like mountains high soaring above
Thy clouds which are fountains of goodness and love.

To all life thou givest — to both great and small;
In all life thou livest, the true life of all;
We blossom and flourish as leaves on the tree,
And wither and perish—but nought changeth thee.

Great Father of glory, pure Father of light,
Thine angels adore thee, all veiling their sight;
All laud we would render: O help us to see
’Tis only the splendour of light hideth thee.

or

Und doch ist Einer, welcher dieses Fallen
unendlich sanft in seinen Händen hält.