Otto Rudolf Schatz (Austria, 1900 – 1961)

Ballonverkäufer
Ballonverkäufer

Schatz came from a family of civil servants and attended the Vienna School of Applied Arts. With 22 years of commitment to the political left, the artist had already appeared as a book illustrator for Arthur Roessler and also for Josef Luitpold Stern. Schatz illustrated  books in the interwar period, especially literature from theStrom-Verlag(including Stefan Zweig , Jack LondonUpton Sinclair’s “Co-op” and Peter Roseggers “Jakob the Last”).

"The Hope," by Otto Rudolf Schatz.
“The Hope,” by Otto Rudolf Schatz.

1925 was the Great Treasure State Award, 1928-38 he was a member of the Hagenbund . He lived during the Second World War treasure in Brno, Prague and later in a sub-camp of Gross-Rosen concentration camp in Graditz admitted that he “jüdisch-versippt” -which apparently meant that by his marriage he was considered part of the Jewish “clan”. Schatz became, on his return, by the City Councillor for Culture. His first prize for the design of the Wiener Westbahnhofs  remained unrealized.

“Die Hoffnung” has the erotic interest that figures in much of Schatz’s work and is vaguely reminiscent of the sardonic style of Edward Burra, who has recently been the subject of a programme by Andrew Graham-Dixon called “I never tell anyone, anything”. This intriguing programme is available on You-Tube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BoLh8xgOdI

Extract from a painting by Edward Burra
Extract from a painting by Edward Burra
Sitzende im schwarzgrüne Trikot
Sitzende im schwarzgrüne Trikot

 

 

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