Andrey Remnev Modern Russian Painter with a touch of the Medieval

Andrey Remnev

Strongly inspired by the Russian artistic movements of the 15th, 17th and 18th centuries, as well as in the painting of medieval icons, Andrey Remnev’s paintings are ostentatious and oddly hypnotic interpretations.


He wasborn and raised in Yachroma, near Moscow, in 1962. He has always been attracted to nature, people, cities and landscapes. Despite referring to medieval painting, Andrey’s works have a subtle and contemporary touch through the most surreal elements that it includes. Many of his paintings focus on women, elegantly dressed, but with wise looks that add mystery and power to their delicately painted figures.


Andrey carries his further influences by emulating old Renaissance recipes using his own handmade colors with natural pigments mixed with egg yolk. The result gives an intoxicating richness and depth to his works.
These paintings remind me both of Gustav Klimt in their use of gold and in their subject matter of the Newlyn Painter, Thomas Cooper Gotch.

The Woman in Gold

I watched and thoroughly enjoyed but was also saddened by this brilliant film viewed as a DVD last night. I visited Vienna in October last year including the Belvedere. The first posters I saw going down into the U-bahn in Munich. Although the places and the actors too were sort of familiar as was the historical context, for instance from reading Eva Menase and George Klaar


The Jewish life in Vienna was so evocatively and poignantly rendered that it brought tears to my eyes. The music was interesting too for obvious reasons and the director’s commentary equally moving. Hence it was particularly interesting to discover in the Penwith Gallery to discover the work of Albert Reuss, who not only was in Vienna at this time but ended his life in Truro having lived in Mousehole nearby. Further info at


The film is also useful for people learning German as the Untertitel in English are so klein!!!

(This article also provides an opportunity to refer to my friend, Susan Soyinka on her family and researches at

(c) Newlyn Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation
(c) Newlyn Art Gallery; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation